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  • How Much Does a Good Axe Cost?

    Posted on April 12th, 2019 admin No comments

    What is the cost of a good axe?

    There are several factors that determine the cost of an axe, but the price is not always related directly to the value. Of six apparently identical axes in a rack, one may well be worth more than the others. Here are the factors to consider:

    Axe head considerations

    A well-forged head will not split or crack, but cheaper axes may not be well-forged. A head that is annealed and hard enough to maintain a good edge may also chip if mistreated.

    Most axes in hardware and camping stores are general-purpose splitting axes, with a wide bevel at the bit, and a convex shape towards the eye.

    “If you just casually camp and want to split wood at campsites where chunks are likely to be gritty – stay with a cheap axe: it will be more durable and the less acute bevel will split knotty stuff better.” – James Aston, http://www.oldjimbo.com/survival/iltis.html

    Axe handle material also affects the cost.

    • Wood is the traditional material and remains the most economical, though cheaper axes use poor wood of low strength and questionable grain hidden by paint. While some feel it is the most ecologically friendly (because of the cost and environmental impact of other materials), it does require regular maintenance and care.
    • Fiberglass – stronger and lighter by comparison to wood, but more costly. Because it is relatively impervious to moisture and abuse by porcupines, and because it damps striking vibrations, it is an increasingly popular choice in standard axes and especially on splitting mauls.
    • Steel – Unibody axes, with head and handle forged as a single unit, are high-end models. The striking force transmitted down the handle is damped with a rubber grip. One popular brand that uses steel handles is Estwing. Cheaper versions may have a tubular steel handle brazed into the eye of a standard head.
    • Composite – New plastic/fibreglass composite materials are finding their way into handles for axes and hatchets.The handle is molded around the head, eliminating the eye. Fiskars and Gerber are well-known brands using this design. Other composites include a fiberglass core, a polypropylene sleeve, and an elastomer grip.

    Watch for sales

    Of course, you’ll want to watch your local stores for specials. Sometimes top quality tools are available at discount prices. You might luck out for a good discount at a “scratch and save” event. Manufacturer’s specials also come up from time to time.

    Get the best axe you can afford

    When choosing an axe based on cost, you’ll still want to look for a tool that will be suited for its intended use and user. Your goal is to select the best axe you can get for the price you pay.

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