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  • Naturehike Tents: Silent Wing vs Ultralight Cycling

    Posted on July 5th, 2017 admin No comments

    I wound up with two light-weight single-person tents:

    Both tents were supposedly available for under $100, though I ended up having to order the Silent Wing from another warehouse and paid about $110.

    Rather than list the specifications side by side, I'll just give a quick comparison.

    Naturehike NH18A095-D without storm skirt

    Naturehike NH18A095-D without storm skirt

    Size

    The cycling tent is a little larger.  Its rectangular floorplan gives a little more room inside for a wider camper or a bit more gear.  The Silent Wing's tapered footprint skimps on floor space but cuts down on weight.  Both tents have roughly equal height from floor to peak, but the crossed poles of the Silent Wing seem to give more headroom.  The cycling tent has an A-frame and when I sit up, the sides of the peak seem pretty close to my head.  Doesn't really bother me, but the Wing definitely feels roomier up top.

    Silent Wing 1 by Korean manufacturer Naturehike

    Silent Wing 1 by Korean manufacturer Naturehike

    Gear Storage

    Both tents have a little (barely adequate) storage pocket; for the SW it's in the roof, for the Cycling tent it's by the door.  Both were handy to keep my glasses safe and out of the way.

    The narrow tapered design of the SW means there's room in the tent for a sleeper and not much else.  I'm short and not too broad, so was able to stow a little gear at the head or foot and a little in the vestibule (boots and bar bag) but the panniers had to go outside under a little tarp.

    The rectangular orange cycling tent is far more roomy.  In the one heavy rain this tent was in, I was able to get all my gear under cover in the tent or under the vestibule without feeling crowded.  A taller, broader camper might not find it so roomy.

    Weatherproofing

    The two tents are similar in density, and waterproofing, with the SW being just a bit lighter fabric.

    I initially had a concern that rain would come in when the vestibule was open.  With the tents  oriented so the vestibule was 45 degrees to the prevailing wind, this turned out not to be a serious issue.  Sure, a little rain got in whenever I went in or out.  It wasn't much.  Before my entry/exit I pushed the sleeping bag back so rain wouldn't hit it.   Then I mopped up the moisture with my towel.  Let's face it, by the time that storm was over, almost everything was a bit damp.

    There was a minor issue of water getting under the fly on the SW during one of two heavy extended rainstorms, but I fixed that by adjusting the fly.  Not the fault of the tent.  I think if I were to use this tent more I'd add another strap to peg the foot end of the fly further out from the tent.

    On the other hand, the storm flaps on the Cycling tent work really well at keeping out rain.  Combined with the A-frame structure, they'd also keep out snow, making this a possible four-season tent. Unfortunately, they also keep out air circulation, and the little triangular vent (similar in both tents) is not sufficient to keep moisture from building up inside the tent.  Condensation on the inside of the fly is common in all tents, but in the SW there is enough air circulation to cut down on condensation a bit.    Both tents were fine with one side of the vestibule left open.

    I used some glue-on Velcro dots to hold the storm flaps up when I want them up.  I can just detach them if I want them down. We'll see if that vents a bit better (Update:  it did help.)

    Conclusions

    I like them both.  The Silent Wing is a bit more technically advanced, is has less floor space but more headroom, and less room for gear storage.  It definitely makes some minor sacrifices to be light and compact.  The Cycling tent is roomier on the floor but has less headroom when I sit up.  The storm flaps may offer some weatherproofing but reduce ventilation.

    Since I will be doing more cycling than backpacking, I'm keeping the orange and will sell the blue.

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