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  • Naturehike Silent Wing One-Person Tent

    Posted on June 14th, 2017 admin No comments

    I wanted a tent for short-distance bike touring and maybe some overnight backpacking. I didn’t need expensive top-end gear for occasional and casual use.  I researched NatureHike and found their products well-reviewed, and in the end wound up with two of their tents for under $200 combined.

    Specs and First Impressions

    This tent, the Naturehike Silent Wing 1,  is promoted on GearBest.com for $69.73 CAD plus $8.74 S/H.   Unfortunately, it’s out of stock at that price.  When I got it, it cost me C$105.12 with shipping.  There was no extra duty or tax.  I thought that even this was a reasonable price for the tent.

    It’s a bit more technical than the Naturehike Cycling tent I previously reviewed (a comparison is elsewhere).  Here are the specs, according to GearBest and Naturehike:

    • GearBest product number 487874
    • Tent inside material: 150D oxford cloth; waterproof index: more than 3000mm
    • Tent outside material: 210T plaid; waterproof index: more than 3000mm
    • Tent pole material: 7001 high strength aluminum pole
    • Footprint material (Wind Wing 1): 150D polyester oxford cloth
    • Rainproof, waterproof and windproof, three seasons design
    • 1 person tent size : 225 x 95 x 110cm / 88.58 x 37.4 x 43.31 inches
    • Product weight: 1.705 kg
    • Package weight: 1.730 kg
    • Package Size(L x W x H): 45.00 x 15.00 x 15.00 cm / 17.72 x 5.91 x 5.91 inches

    Silent Wing Close

    Package Contents

    The tent came from GearBest with the following:

    • 1 x Tent
    • 1 x Fly Sheet
    • 1 x Cinch strap
    • 8 x Aluminum Y-profile Pegs with storage sack
    • 4 x Guy lines
    • 1 x Set of Aluminum poles with storage sack
    • 1 x Storage Bag for all of the above
    • 1 x Wind Wing 1 footprint (fits the Silent Wing) with storage bag

    The tent itself, with bag, poles, pegs, guys, and fly, weighed 1554 grams; the footprint and bag were 162 g; total mass 1716 grams or 1.716 kg, very close to the stated mass (this is not always the case).

    Wind-Wing 1 by Korean manufacturer Naturehike

    Wind-Wing 1 / Silent Wing 1 by Korean manufacturer Naturehike

     

    Silent Wing vs Wind Wing

    Wind Wing Mat

    Silent Wing 1 tent with Wind Wing 1 mat (footprint)

    The Silent Wing is not even listed on the Naturehike web site.  The current model is the Wind Wing, which based on the specs at Naturehike is more waterproof (4000 mm vs 3000 mm), with reduced weight (1360 g).  In terms of layout and design, the two tents appear to be highly similar, to the point where a Wind Wing mat was included with the Silent Wing tent.

    Impressions:  The Good

    There are some technical features I like that remind me of higher-level tents such as those by MSR; I find these atrractive in a product at this price point.

    •  The crossed-pole design gives lots of headroom and a feeling of spaciousness inside.
    • It has a tapered floor, wide at the head end and narrowing to the foot.  This cuts down on mass, but also reduces floor space.  Don’t plan to take much gear inside, especially if you’re tall or broad.
    • There is a well-fitted, full-cover fly without a storm skirt.  Some people fear that this design can allow wind and rain to blow into the tent, although with other tents of similar design I have not found this to be an issue.
    • All guys and tethers are 1 mm cord, with lightweight plastic locks on the guys.
    • There are reflective strips on the fly clips — they show up quite brightly in a flashlight beam so you don’t trip on them in the dark
    • The stuff sack is roomy and I have never had trouble packing up the tent, even wet.
    • The aluminum pegs are y-beam, similar to MSR (Mountain Safety Research) Mini-Groundhog stakes.
    • The tent ground attachments are  strap-and-cord, a few grams lighter than plain straps, but still with grommets for the poles.  Compare the MSR method which puts the pole into a small tab attached to the cord and shaves off a few more grams per attachment.
    Red poles to the gold grommet (top), grey poles to the silver grommet (bottom)

    Strap-and-string.  Red poles to the gold grommet (top), grey poles to the silver grommet (bottom), peg thru the string

    Impressions:  The Bad

    I do have some reservations about the design.

    • Better quality tents generally have a ridge-pole across the top that extends the fly over the door.  This little roof peak provides additional headroom and helps keep rain out of the tent when the vestibule is open.
    • The vestibule is quite small.  There’s not a lot of room for gear storage there.

    The Silent Wing appears to be an earlier version of the Wind Wing, and I expect the latter to have some changes/improvements to reduce the mass even further.  Perhaps the grommets are red, for better color matching with the poles.

    Tapered footprint cuts down weight, but reduces floor space

    Tapered footprint cuts down weight, but reduces floor space

    Impressions:  The Ugly

    It’s not something I’d considered before, because my previous tent had a front entry.   The Silent Wing is a left-handed tent.  When you are inside, looking out the door, you are laying on your right side.  Your left hand is free, so that is the easiest one to use to unzip the door.  I’m right-handed, so this is just a bit awkward.    I can push myself up with my left hand and open the door with my right.  Not impossible, just awkward.

    My sleeping bag has a left-hand zipper.  When I am lying on my back, the zipper is on my left side.  It’s never bothered me before. I turn that way and undo the zipper with my right hand.  But in this tent, the zipper is on the side away from the door; unzipping the bag puts me with my back to the door so I have to undo the bag further and roll over to access the door.  Not impossible, just awkward.  A sleeping bag with a right-hand zipper would make this easier…but am I prepared to buy another sleeping bag just to make the tent easier?

    Conclusion

    My first impression is favorable.  This light-weight Naturehike Silent Wing tent appears to be well-made and quite suitable for bicycle touring and backpacking or to toss under the back seat of the pickup for emergency use.  I expect that it would wear well and last several seasons of occasional, casual use. The greatest drawbacks are the small vestibule and a fly designed to let rain in when you enter or exit the tent. And the awkwardness of the left/right thing.   We’ll see if actual use confirms the first impression.

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