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  • Naturehike Ultralight Cycling Tent: Life Inside

    Posted on June 14th, 2017 admin No comments

     

    Naturehike Cycling Silicone Ultralight One Man Tent

    I’ve had this entry-level backpacking/cycling tent for a month and have used it several times.  When first I received it, I reviewed the specifications and gave my first impressions.  Then, I reviewed the ease (or not) of setup and takedown.    Now it's time for a quick review of life under the flysheet, actually using the tent.  I have spent five nights in this tent so far, enough time go know the pros and cons.

    Two Versions:  Plain and Storm Skirt

    There are two versions of the fly sheet.  The first one is a normal "full-cover" fly, as shown below. This version allows air to flow from the bottom of the fly up and out through the vent.

    Naturehike NH18A095-D without storm skirt

    Naturehike NH18A095-D without storm skirt

    The second version of the fly has a storm skirt, also known as storm flaps or snow flaps.  This is the version I received from Bangood.com.

    Set up in my back yard for first impressions

    Set up in my back yard for first impressions, showing the storm skirt

    Con:  Ventilation Limited; Tiny Vestibule

     Ventilation is minimal in this tent, limited to a little triangular aperture above the head end.

    One one occasion, I set up during a warm evening as a thunderstorm was coming in. The air temperature dropped while I was putting up the tent on wet grass, and immediately there was condensation under the fly. The storm hit and I ducked inside and closed the vestibule. With me inside, water was running down the fly (but fortunately, not dripping into the tent). A couple of hours after I went to sleep, I woke up hot and sweaty -- the tent was like a sauna, warm and damp.

    I hauled my gear inside the tent, undid the vestibule, stretched the left panel as far to the right across the tent door as I could, to try to minimize the rain coming into the tent,  and went back to sleep in my damp bag.   Aside from what came in through the door, there was no water inside the tent.

    Fortunately, the next day was sunny and I was able to dry everything out.

     

    Pro:  Relatively Roomy

    I've already discussed ease of setup, ability to put up the fly first then add the tent underneath (I did this in a dry run, but fortunately, I haven't had to do this yet in a storm), and some other features.  During use, I found another advantage to this tent.

    During the storm, I took my gear (two 20L panniers and my shoes) out from under the vestibule into the tent with me -- fortunately there's enough room.  I'm a short guy (5'7", 170 cm), not too big (155 lb, 70 kg) and I find this tent roomy.  On my last trip, I had two 20L panniers and a front bag, plus my shoes, in the tent with me.  I can put them at the head or foot of the tent, or range them in a row beside me in any combination, and still not press too badly on the sides of the tent.  A taller, bulkier traveler will have enough floor space for comfort, but might not have room for gear.

    Of course, I'd much rather those things didn't share my tent, and there's just barely enough from for them in the vestibule.  There'd probably be enough room there for a small backpack.   But it's marketed as a cycling tent.

    In the meantime, I picked up a lightweight nylon tarp to use as to extend the vestibule, to give more room for gear and so I can enter and exit the tent in a storm without letting in too much rain.  We'll see how that works out.

    Conclusion: Decent Tent

    I'm quite satisfied with this tent, given its $75 CAD pricelist (shipping included).   The tent is lightweight, compact, reasonably well-made, and serves its purpose as an entry-level one-person tent for occasional use. Its major flaw is that there is no "roof peak" over the entry, so rain can come right into the tent if the vestibule is open or as you enter/exit the tent.  Naturehike has other lightweight 1-man and 2-man tents that do not have these restrictions.

    The tent is available at Banggood as I write this.

    Disclaimer:  I am not connected with either Banggood or Naturehike and I have received no compensation or incentive for this review.

    Further Reading on Naturehike Lightweight Cycling Tent

     

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