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  • Cycling Red Deer to Lacombe and Back

    Posted on May 29th, 2017 admin No comments

    One Saturday, as part of a Meetup bike trip, I rode the Trans Canada Trail from Red Deer to Lacombe and back, roughly 55-60 km.  The trip was a training ride for the Leduc-Camrose MSBike, one of many such events to raise money for MS research.

    It was the longest ride I’ve done so far — and I survived!

    We Meet Near Cronquist House

    We — Susan, Mesut, and me — started at historical Cronquist House beside Bower Ponds in the Red Deer River valley.

    From https://www.ehcanadatravel.com/gallery/index/category/1891-bower_ponds_park

    Cronquist House:  From https://www.ehcanadatravel.com/gallery/index/category/1891-bower_ponds_park

     

    The ponds themselves are a delightful park, and I had come half an hour early to bike around the ponds and to wait for the others in the group.  Bower Ponds Map

    We took off on time at 10:00 am, and stopped briefly for photos at the Trans Canada Trail Pavillion, which is just a bit south and east around the first pond.CTC Pavillion

    CTC Pavillion Close

    Mesut and Susan

    After our photo stop, we rode out for the long uphill that is Taylor Drive.  The ride through the city is not bad, a wide paved route though residential, green, and industrial areas.  There was a 20 kph headwind to cope with, but it mostly just kept us cool.

    At the northern end of Red Deer, the trail moves onto the old CE Trail.  We biked around a bit before reconfirming that our route was straight across the highway.  The Calgary-Edmonton Trail is a paved but shoulderless rural road that  I enjoyed thoroughly.  This scenic route passes through fields and forests, past ponds and acreages; there was little traffic, flat travel, and open vistas.

    Blindman River Bridge

    We had one little blip at the end of the CE Trail, when a traffic sign read “No Exit, Subdivisions Only”.  There really should have been a TCT sign on that post!  Fortunately, both the TCT app on my phone and my travelling companions (who had done the route before) said that was the way to go.  Sure enough, there was a little footbridge at the end to get us across the Blindman River.   Fran, the fourth member of the group, met us there.

    Photo by Mesut

    Fran, Tom, Susan.  Photo by Mesut, obviously.

     

    Blackfalds and Abbey Centre

    The four of us set out for Blackfalds, where the trail took us through some residential areas and eventually to the Abbey Centre, a 41,000 sq. ft. recreation complex.  The Trans-Canada Trail runs right through the building.  I think we entered at the treed area in the upper left as shown in the photo below, rode a ways, then came down a flight of stairs to emerge in the parking lot, lower left.

    Photo by Town of Blackfalds

    Photo by Town of Blackfalds

    We didn’t take much time to explore the fitness centre, but did pause to have our photo taken by the big trail sign:

    Photo by Fran M.

    Susan, Tom, Mesut, Fran.  Photo by Fran M, courtesy of a passerby.

    A brief pitstop at the centre’s washrooms, followed by a quick (and slightly confused) circumnavigation of the Centre saw us en route for Lacombe.   This stretch of trail, the County of Lacombe Trail, was another wonderful and scenic stretch that meandered through fields and forests and took us past the Lacombe Agricultural Research Station into the city.

    Tom on a stretch of the Lacombe County Trail.  Photo by Fran

    Tom on a stretch of the Lacombe County Trail. Photo by Fran.  Shows you what wonderful weather we had.

    Lunch at Ugly’s Pub & Grill

    Fran led us downtown, to Ugly’s Pub and Grill for lunch, at about 12:20 (a little later than estimated.  Oh, well).

    Ugly's Pub & Grill

    Here we are, all filled up with beverages and pub grub:

    Lunch at Ugly's

     

    And Back to Red Deer

    After that, there was nothing to do but go home.   The trip back always seems shorter, and this time we had the wind mostly at our back.  Even so, some of the little hills just south of Lacombe seemed pretty nasty to tired legs, and at least one cyclist walked a bit (not saying, but not me).

    We stopped at a picnic area just northwest of the Blindman bridge for a rest break and to say ‘bye to Fran.  Then back along the CE Trail, as pretty coming as it was going.   Finally, we finished with the long downhill on Taylor Drive, varied with a little hop across the road on a pedestrian bridge and straight down into Bower Ponds, a more direct route than we took on the way out.

    Who, Me, Tired?

    I had had a big beer and a big glass of water at lunch, and still by the time I reached the Lions Campground, some 6 km downstream, I had sucked my water bottle dry.  I guess that where the group did roughly 55 km, I must have added another 12+,  which is almost the distance I have to ride for MS Bike from Leduc to Camrose next month.    A little nap after supper, followed by two rum-and-Cokes and a lot of peanuts and potato chips (must have been short of salt!  Next time I’ll remember to have a sports drink) and I was fine.

    So what did I do the next day?  After my meetings at the Kerry Wood Nature Centre, I went for another hour and a half bike ride.  But that’s another story.

     

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