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  • Ride in the Rain, Cycle in the Snow

    Posted on April 23rd, 2017 admin No comments

     

    Or, I Wish You Had Been There!

    Our Meetup ride around the Leduc Multiways was a great ride -- too bad nobody came!

    I biked from home to the parking lot that was the trailhead, and  waited from 1:45 to 2:20. My apologies to Joan, Deloris, and Catalina if they arrived after I left . I was dressed warmly enough that, with everything zipped up, I was not cold as I waited in the wind shelter of a dugout at the ball diamond, in sight of the parking lot.

    After it was clear that no one was coming, I went for a ride by myself, and  was a nice enough ride.   By then, the multiway paths had been either cleared or had melted clean, and the wind had died down enough not to be much of a nuisance.  I had one fewer layers than I wore this morning, and was totally toasty but not too warm for the entire ride.

    Test Your Cycling Gear

    Deliberately riding in inclement weather is excellent training for both how you dress and how you ride.

    You get to test your gear, to see how things work.  Too cold?  Maybe one more layer.  Too warm?  Open the neck or pit zips, or strip one layer.   Wet feet?  Maybe better footwear or rain booties needed.   Cold head?  Maybe a skull cap, or masking tape over the helmet vents.  Getting wet?  Either you are sealed up too tight in waterproof gear (aka portable sauna), or something leaks.

    What about your bike?  How does it handle snow or puddles?  Are you comfortable with how it handles?  Can you manage the gear changes required?  How do your brakes hold up when wet (stopping takes a lot longer!)?   How wet will you get from splash back from the front wheel?   Does your back fender or trunk bag stop water from giving you a wet stripe up the back?

    Test Yourself

    You also get to challenge yourself, to learn how to handle adverse riding conditions.  It's important to know what you can stand and what you can stand up to.  It's better to do this deliberately -- as a training exercise, on a local ride where you can head for home or the car quickly if something is amiss -- rather than run into bad weather on a longer trip where you're unprepared and have no easy out.  Knowing that "I've handled worse than this in training!" makes it easier to cope with what the sky throws at you.

    If you're packing your gear, this is a reality check -- how quickly can I access my rain gear and get into it?  Is what I need readily accessible?  In this as in most things, practice and experience pay off.

    Conclusion

    Personal experience:  a ride like today's, in +2C with light snow and wind, is far more pleasant than riding in light rain.  Riding in heavy rain, even if you're well-equipped and properly prepared, can be kind of a drowner.  Uh, downer.

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