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  • Bicycle Touring Workshop with Ed Weymouth

    Posted on April 9th, 2017 admin 1 comment

    Bike Touring Workshop

    Hosted by Circuit Cycle & Sports, Millet
    April 9, 2017
    Featuring Ed Weymouth, Trip Leader for Edmonton Bike & Touring Club

    Ed jumped around a bit during the course of his interesting and entertaining presentation; these notes represent my attempt to organize the material. Any errors or omissions are mine.

    Ed Weymouth

    Presenter Ed Weymouth (Image from LinkedIn)

    General Considerations

    • Regardless of type, duration, or destination, any bike tour will be constrained by three considerations: time, cost, and health. The tour must fit your available time and budget, and must be doable in terms of your age, experience, and ability.

    • Always advise people of where you are going, whether it’s a group tour, a solo tour, etc.

    • keep notes of some sort — a blog, a diary, a trip log

    Types of Touring

    • Supported vs Unsupported riding – a supported ride has a vehicle (SAG wagon, Support and Gear) to carry heavier gear such as sleeping and cooking equipment. In an unsupported ride, the cyclist carries everything.

    • Group vs. Individual Organization – a tour group sets the itinerary, overnight stops, etc. and may provide bikes and other gear for a fixed price. An individually organized tour means the cyclists can adjust their schedule, stay longer in some spots, etc. Tour companies may also assist in self-directed tours.

    • Camping Tour – — the cyclist totes everything for overnight camping, meals, etc. at a campground. A common and inexpensive way of touring

    • “Credit Card Touring” — cyclists simply carry spare clothing and maintenance equipment, but stop at a hotel or B&B for the night. Often the most expensive option.

    • Free Stay Touring — sites such as couchsurfing.com and warmshowers.org assist cyclists in finding hospitality stays with local residents. Free on a “pay it forward” plan. Sounds like fun.

    • Stealth Camping — the cyclist sets up camp at any convenient spot, rather than in an actual campground. Usually fine if you clean up. Perfectly acceptable in some ares, perhaps considered trespassing in others. Another low-cost option.

    • Radonneuring — sometimes considered to be a type of touring. Also known as Audax in some countries, this is a sport where long distances (200 km up) must be cycled in a specified time.

    Preparing for a TourCircuit-Cycle-logo-final

    Once you’ve decided on your destination, route, budget, etc. there are many things to do before the actual tour

    • Get yourself in shape — ride enough that you will be able to handle the tour — “toughen your butt” to the saddle

    • Get your bike in shape — new tires & tubes, have it tuned up, gears adjusted, chain cleaned & lubed and all that

    • Acquire the equipment you need, including racks, panniers, clothing, etc. (discussed elsewhere)

    • Field test your setup and do some practice runs. If you’re camping, do some local overnight trips.

    Gearing Up

    • What to take depends on your type of touring, but gear good for a three-day trip is also good for three months or more

    • Check online for kit lists — see the online resources section.

    • There are three factors to consider: weight, volume, and cost. Light, small, and compact all cost money. Big, bulky items are harder to pack. Heavy items mean harder pedalling and make hills a greater challenge.

    • Places to carry include handlebar bags (easily accessible for oft-needed items such as camera), front rack & panniers, rear r1ack & panniers. Include frame bags, underseat bags etc. for small items. A “trunk bag” may ride atop the rear rack separate from the panniers.

    • It’s important to have waterproof storage (not just water repellent). A dry-bag such as used by kayakers and canoeists is useful, but plastic bags inside the panniers work okay too. Waterproof pannier covers are also available. Tuck your passport [or your dry socks] into a zip-lock sandwich bag.

    • [Ed didn't mention it, but I think suitcase packing systems (nylon compression bags) and stuff sacks look useful for organizing your gear in a pannier]

    • A BOB (“beast of burden”) trailer may be useful if you need to carry more gear.

    • Balance is important. Weight needs to be properly distributed between front and rear and side-to-side. An unbalanced bike may be hard to steer and difficult to manage. It may take several re-packings and test rides to get this right.

    • Take spares — Things will shake loose, fall off, get lost… Take nuts, bolts, a tube, a brake cable.

    • Have repair tools and know how to use them. Know how to replace a tube, adjust your gears, adjust your brakes. [Take Brian's repair courses!]

    • Clothing selection – look for items that will wick perspiration, go lightweight, use layering. Again, there is a trade-off between cost, weight, and bulk.

    • Rain gear is a challenge and often acts as a sauna. Gore-tex may not “breathe” fast enough for a hard-pedalling cyclist.

    Navigation: Old vs New

    • Old-school navigation uses paper: bike tour books, maps, activity guides and such. Handle bar bags still have waterproof see-through top pockets for these materials.

    • New-school navigation involves electronics: GPS units, smart phones, tablets, and internet sites. It’s a wireless world, and these methods work reliably even in many “third world” locations. Euroveloroute.com is a site Ed recommends.

    Banjo Bros.  saddlebag panniers.  Image courtesy Circuit Cycle & Sports

    Banjo Bros. saddlebag panniers. Image courtesy Circuit Cycle & Sports

    Overseas Touring

    Getting your gear overseas can be a challenge. Airlines limit the size, weight, and amount of gear you can take on board. For bike touring, there are five choices:

    1. Pack your bike (and other gear) in a bike box for air freight. Boxes are available at bike shops and moving companies. This involves removal of seat/post, pedals, and sometimes front wheel as well as loosening and rotating the handle bars. Be prepared to have Customs open the box to examine it; carry duct tape and use nylon straps to re-seal the box. A recent alternative to the box is a heavy plastic bag; because customs officials can see into it, it needn’t be opened; but some feel it does not protect the bike as well as a box.

    2. Have your local bike shop pack the bike into a box or bag. Ed says the cost is around $50

    3. Rent a bike at your destination. [Many bike rental shops will also rent racks, panniers, tool sets, helmets, and other gear; will adjust the bike to your body; will perform a pre-trip tuneup.]

    4. Travel with a group tour that also provides bicycles and other equipment as part of the tour price.

    5. Buy a bike at the tour start, and either take it home with you at the end or arrange to sell it at trip’s end.

    Plan Your Dream Tour

    Ed asked us to think of our dream tour — where we would love to go with our bikes.  I guess mine would be Europe (I had booked a bike tour in Copenhagen as part of a cruise last year, but the tour company came to the wrong dock and I had to miss it).  Maybe another time.

    Online resources mentioned by Ed:

     

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