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  • 1910 Nostalgia

    Posted on December 19th, 2014 admin No comments

    Got another one of those emails filled with “statistics” of dubious value.   With accurate information from reputable sources so readily available online, it always amazes me that people will make up — and believe, and forward — shit like this.

     

    1910 Ford

    read all the statistics under the photo.

    This has only been 104 years ago…Amazing!!!

    1910 Ford

    Show this to your friends, children and/or grandchildren! 

    The year is 1910, over one hundred years ago. What a difference a century makes!

     

    Here are some statistics for the Year 1910:

    (applies to the USA)

    These “stats” are designed to make you nod and say, “Wow, I didn’t know that!”.   But DO you know that?  Are the “facts” that come in an anonymous, unsourced email accurate?

    ***********************************

    The average life expectancy for men was 47 years.    Google “US Life expectancy 1910″ for the surprising answer.

    Fuel for this car was sold in drug stores only.  [False].  “The first public gasoline servers were simply called filling stations. They were just curbside hand pumps, and they began appearing in 1907…. The gas station started taking shape around 1910.  By 1920 it was well-defined. It was a small building with gas pumps in front. But it also offered supplies — tires, batteries, and oil. It offered simple services — lube jobs and tire patching.”   http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi975.htm

    Only 14 percent of the homes had a bathtub.   Depends on what you mean by “bathtub”, I guess.  Up to the early 1950s, people bathed in a large copper or galvanized steel tub.  It was still a bathtub!

    Only 8 percent of the homes had a telephone.  Could be.

    There were only 8,000 cars and only 144 miles of paved roads.  False, and ridiculously so, but look it up yourself.   In 1910 alone, Henry Ford built and sold almost 20,000 cars!  http://www.greatachievements.org/?id=3786 gives the total number of vehicles on US roads in 1910.  People who write these emails got no brains and do no research.  You got brains, so do a little research, find out how many miles of roads were paved (and be careful how you define “paved”: does it include macadam, brick, cobbles, etc.?) in 1910.

    The maximum speed limit in most cities was 10 mph.  I think whoever wrote this reworked an email about 1850.

    The tallest structure in the world was the Eiffel Tower !   [True!]   If you google “world’s tallest building 1910″ you’ll get a different answer — but the Eiffel Tower is not considered a building.   Do you know what is the tallest structure in the world today?

    The average US wage in 1910 was 22 cents per hour. 

    Check the wages and prices here:  http://usa.usembassy.de/etexts/his/e_prices1.htm.  Or for some really detailed data, try http://libraryguides.missouri.edu/c.php?g=28284&p=174165.

    The average US worker made between $200 and $400 per year.  At $0.22 hr,  that’s a not lot of hours each week (about 18 hours a week for fifty weeks gives $200 annually, in a time when the average work week was 45 hours).  The math doesn’t work — try it!  A lot of part-time work and unemployment?  Other sources disagree with these figures.

    A competent accountant could expect to earn $2000 per year,

    A dentist $2,500 per year, a veterinarian between $1,500 and $4,000 per year,

    And a mechanical engineer about $5,000 per year.

    More than 95 percent of all births took place at HOME.     Perhaps many women would prefer to have a home birth rather than a hospital birth (and potential exposure to superbugs) — but are they given much choice?  I wonder what the infant survival rate was in 1910, compared to 2014, and the cost of a birth in 1910 vs 2014.

    Ninety percent of all Doctors had NO COLLEGE EDUCATION!

    Instead, they attended so-called medical schools,

    Many of which were condemned in the press AND the government as ‘substandard.’   Yeah, the history of modern medicine is a fascinating topic!

    Sugar cost four cents a pound.

    Eggs were fourteen cents a dozen.

    Coffee was fifteen cents a pound.

    Check those prices — are they accurate?  The figures are readily available online.

    Then compare prices with the average hourly wage.  How long did a man have to work in 1910 at $0.22/hr to buy a dozen eggs and a pound of coffee? About an hour and twenty minutes.   With coffee at $10 a pound and eggs at $2 a dozen (in my corner of Alberta, anyway) a minimum-wage employee– US average 7.25/hr as of Jan 1, 2014–works about 1 hour and forty minutes. .  If anything we’ve lost ground.

    BTW, The average income is skewed upwards by all the millionaires and billionaires, then and now; the median income or modal income are more accurate measures.

    Most women only washed their hair once a month, [not sure how you'd prove THAT!] and used Borax or egg yolks for shampoo.

    There was no such thing as under arm deodorant or tooth paste.   Google “toothpaste invented” or “invention of toothpaste”  and find out the truth about toothpaste in seconds!  Do the same for underarm deodorant.

    Canada passed a law that prohibited poor people from entering into the country for any reason.   [False?  True?]  The immigration act of 1910 introduced a measure by which all immigrants to Canada would have to possess at least $25 upon landing as a way of proving to government officials that they weren’t destitute.   Do we have similar provisions today, to prevent destitute immigrants from becoming “a burden on society” and sucking up resources best devoted to Canadian citizens?

    The five leading causes of death were:

    1. Pneumonia and influenza

    2, Tuberculosis

    3. Diarrhea

    4. Heart disease

    5. Stroke

    Probably true.  The influenza epidemic of 1911 apparently killed more people than died in WW1.  Check it out for yourself.

    The American flag had 45 stars.  Could be.

    The population of Las Vegas Nevada was only 30! False

    A search of the 1910 census for Las Vegas NV gives 3,333 residents in the census district (I didn’t bother to check municipal figures).  Demographia gives the population as 2000 in 1910.  Las Vegas was incorporated as a city in 1911, with a vote of 168 for and 57 against (total 225).  Either number is a far cry from the 30 given in the email.

    Crossword puzzles [false], canned beer [true], and iced tea [false] hadn’t been invented yet.   The first crosswords appeared in England during the 19th century, says this site. The first beer was available in cans beginning in 1935.[2]  “Seen as a novelty at first, during the 1870s [iced tea] became quite widespread. Not only did recipes appear in print, but iced tea was offered on hotel menus, and was on sale at railroad stations. Its popularity rapidly increased after Richard Blechynden introduced it at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis.” ~ Wikipedia

    There was no Mother’s Day (sort of false, sort of true; the first was in Virginia in 1908 but it didn’t receive national recognition until 1914) or Father’s Day (likewise, also started in Virginia in 1908 and celebrated in various places until 1910, but only went national in the 1930s)

    Two out of every 10 adults couldn’t read or write [false] and only 6 percent of all Americans had graduated from high school.

    This is easy to check by census data, which recorded the self-reported ability to read or write.  According to the NAAL, the 1910 illiteracy rate of persons over 14 was 7.7%.  That is roughly 8 of a hundred (2 out of 10 would be 20 out of a hundred) at a time when a person of 14 was expected to do a day’s work as an adult.  In 1910 a “good” education was Grade 6 to 8 and higher education was frequently unavailable or unaffordable,  so the number graduating from high school may not be relevant.

    Eighteen percent of households had at least one full-time servant or domestic help.  Oddly enough, this may be true.  My genealogical work shows that  in the 1800s most farm families of any substance had a house servant and one or more “hired hands” as farm helpers.  Not sure about 1910.

    There were about 230 reported murders in the ENTIRE U.S.A. !   [false]

    I’ve seen similar nostalgically low figures in other emails–we want to believe that times were gentler then.  Sorry! Not so.  Several Internet sources  report a homicide rate in 1910 of 4.6 per 100,000. (Google “1910 homicide rate”). The U.S. census of 1910 reported a U.S. population of 92,228,496. Simple arithmetic reveals a homicide number of 4,242 for that year.

    (yes, people have changed) 

    Oh, maybe not.  Gossip still abounds, and people still regard the past with rose-colored glasses – but today people gleefully spread falsehoods to all their friends with the click of a Forward button!

    I guess people just want to believe that “things were better then” and are too lazy to seek the facts.   So I’ve done some of this for you.  Enjoy.

    Hey — before you forward this to everybody, why not check out one more of the “facts” in the list?

     

  • Football and Square Dancing

    Posted on October 25th, 2014 admin No comments

    Last Tuesday was the first lesson in our new square dance group at Devon, Alberta.  I’d rented a Bose L1 Compact to play with, and this was a good opportunity to test it out.

    To my surprise, when I turned down the music and was greeting the dancers, I could hear what sounded like a football game coming over the L1.    It was faint, and people could hear my voice fine, but they could also hear the radio.   We ignored it for the first part of the lesson, because when the music was playing, we couldn’t hear it much.

    During the lesson, I noticed that when I shut the mic off, the radio sound quit.  Aha!  At the first break, I changed to a shorter mic cord.  No more game in the background.

    I later asked the guy at Long & McQuade, where I had rented the Bose, and he said that it sometimes happened.  Could have been coming from the power in the building, and plugging into a different receptacle might have helped; could have been a cross-wired mic cord, and I could check the connections (did that when I got home, all okay); but changing the cord showed that the first cord was just the right length to be an antenna and pull in the radio signal.

    Would never have dreamed that could happen — but at least I had a spare cord and was able to fix the issue quickly and still look fairly professional.

     

     

  • Mixer

    Posted on October 5th, 2014 admin No comments

    Multimix8USBFX, $150 with free shipping from Axe Music

    Mixer arrived, Alesis Multimix8USBFX from Axe Music in Edmonton, $150 with free shipping.   Good deal.   Having fun playing with all the settings.  A bit disappointed in the effects, which are more limited than I expected: many of the settings sound identical.   Maybe they’ll be better with the Bose?

  • Event on Facebook

    Posted on September 27th, 2014 admin No comments

    I added an event on Facebook.  First time!

    Took me a while to find it on my page.   I’ll make it easy:  Go HERE

     

  • Do Us a Flavour? Ick and Meh!

    Posted on September 17th, 2014 admin No comments

    Had the opportunity to try two of Lay’s new Canadian potato chip flavors.

    Meh!

    Meh!

    First up:  Bacon Poutine.   On opening the bag, I did note a scent of bacon.   The chips do taste a bit like bacon, a bit like gravy.  Couldn’t get any sense of cheese.   They were okay, not as good as BBQ by any means.  Perhaps that’s because I found the flavours quite subtle, without the tang or bite of BBQ.   My wife ate a couple but didn’t want more.  Neither did I, really, but we’d paid for the bag, so I washed them down with rum & cola.  They weren’t all that bad, just sort of “Meh!”.

    Ick!

    Ick!

    Next in line:  Cinnamon Bun.  We both had left these sitting on the counter for a couple of days.  Neither of us really wanted to open them.  When do you eat cinnamon buns?  For breakfast, or maybe a coffee time snack.   We couldn’t quite manage the idea of having potato chips for breakfast, so finally we opened them with an afternoon coffee.  Okay, they smell of cinnamon.  So far, so good. Wife ate one, refused the rest.  I had two and didn’t want any more.  We wound up throwing the rest away.  Gotta be the worst flavor imaginable for potato chips. Ick.  I can’t believe that anybody would vote for these.  De gustibus non est disputandum, I guess.

    After this inauspicious beginning, do we dare try the other two (jalapeno mac ‘n’ cheese and tzatziki)?

  • CANYA Calling

    Posted on September 14th, 2014 admin No comments

    Saturday night we called a hoedown for CANYA, Classis Alberta North Young Adults, at a facility south of Spruce Grove.

    This was a repeat engagement, and again a lively bunch wth about four squares (32 people) dancing on an outdoor patio.
    About a third were there last year, and requested moves from that night.  I called the ABC Basics program, again meaning to move into the A moves, but wound up doing some old-time dances including Pattycake Polka, Rip & Snort, and No-Name Contra, all of which were immensely popular.

    It was a cool night.  The dancers stayed warm because I kept them moving (and they’re hot-blooded anyway), but by the end of the night I was wearing a hoodie, a jean jacket, and a vest, and trading hands between holding the mike and warming up in a pocket.

    Several came up to thank us afterwards and say they enjoyed the dance and the variety compared to last year.  Several took brochures and business cards and said they would see about having a dance in their home church (CAN is a division of the Christian Reformed Church).

    Future gigs would be nice, but watching the folks laughing and having fun sure makes it fun for us.

  • Trek II, the Hoedown Continues

    Posted on September 6th, 2014 admin No comments

    Got an email recently from the Bonnie Doon Stake, as a follow up to Trek.

    I was at the Hoe down you did for the Mormon church out near Cold Lake last month and I’m in charge of activities for the Bonnie Doon Stake.  We were wondering if you are available to come and do another Hoe Down for us on either October 24 or 25.  We will be holding this Hoe Down at our Bonnie Doon location….  Are you able to be our caller?
    Apparently there will be up to 300 people.   The event has been booked for Oct. 25 and is on my calling calendar.
    Repeat business is a terrific compliment.
    Thank you note
  • Rogers Rewards the Sedentary

    Posted on August 21st, 2014 admin No comments

    Recently bought a smart phone.  Loving it, should have got one years ago!

    It’s with Rogers, which has a customer loyalty program that offers points for their monthly contract and other things.  Today I got an email from Rogers offering three rewards for under 1000 points:  movies, a monthly TV theme pack, and long-distance phone minutes.

    Since our contract has unlimited long-distance in Canada, that last one isn’t of great value.  As for the other rewards, thanks but no thanks.  They’re clearly oriented to couch potatoes, sluggards, stay-at-homes, and the obese-to-be.  A one-month TV pack, oh my fat butt!

    I look forward to receiving rewards for the active and energetic.  How about a pass to a local fitness center, coupons for active wear, discounts at a bike shop.

  • CALLING AT TREK 2014

    Posted on July 20th, 2014 admin 2 comments

    Had a great time calling at Trek 2014 out east of Cherry Grove, AB.

    Dawn in a borrowed bonnet

    Dawn in a borrowed bonnet

    The trek — a simulated re-enactment of the Mormon hand-cart migrations to Utah in the mid 1850s — saw an estimated 190 youth and 50 adults in an approximation of period clothing building hand-cart kits, loading up their sleeping bags and gear, and hauling them some 25 km over rough terrain.

    We pulled the rig in on Thursday afternoon, in time to go and watch the group playing various “pioneer” games such as tug-of-war, cow-patty toss, log-sawing, and the like.  Fun to watch, and despite having trekked some 15 km the day before, up and down hills and through swamps, the kids seemed to have a lot of energy.

    Wow, a cow-patty frisbee!  (Painted polyurethane foam)

    Wow, a cow-patty frisbee! (Painted polyurethane foam)

    The hoe-down was Thursday night, about mid-way into their trek.  Not sure if all the participants danced, but they sure spread out in the field.  I had chosen dances and music of the period to add to the authenticity of the experience.  I called some old-time circle dances, a contra, and a reel, which saw enthusiastic and lively participation.

    Mounted mobbers arrive at dusk.  "Git offa our land!  Move, varmints!"

    Mounted mobbers arrive at dusk. “Git offa our land! Move, varmints!”

    I was just starting Cumberland Squares, with plans to move into some old-time square dances, when a group of masked horsemen (“mobbers”) broke up the dance and drove the campers off the land–something that also happened in the historical migration.  One dancer complained, “But we’re having a hoe-down!”  No matter — clear out!

    The group was packed up and moving fast within a surprisingly short time.   Although I had not been directed by the mobbers to clear out, with the dancers gone there was no point to my staying; I packed up and left too.

    In preparing for the dance, I learned a lot about the trek migrations, the early history of the Mormon church, and about songs and dances of the 1800s.  And calling for all those folks in an open field was a unique experience!

    A big thank you to all those who helped with setting up equipment and dance formations; thanks especially to the Bonnie Doon Stake for organizing the Trek and for hiring me to call the hoedown.

    Followup:  Trek II, the Hoedown Continues

  • Montague Folding Bike – A Bit of Cycling History

    Posted on June 28th, 2014 admin No comments

    MONTAGUE FULL-SIZE FOLDING BIKE

    Last winter, at an estate sale in California, I found a bike with an interesting-looking frame labeled “BMW Wireline”.  It was a full-sized bike, but was obviously designed to fold.  It had no tires, the handgrips were melted, the wheels wouldn’t turn, the rear derailleur was bent, the headset was frozen, the brake pads were like rock, the chain was rusted in place.  Still, it had a CrMo folding frame in good condition, alloy wheels, decent quality caliper brakes.

    The owner had no idea of the provenance except that it had been in his sister’s garage for decades and he wanted to get rid of it.

    “Make me an offer,” he said.  I offered $1.  He accepted.   I threw some breadbags over the tar-like handgrips and stowed it under the RV.

    When we returned in the spring, I hauled the bike home and set to work.  The California heat had been hard on the bike.   I scraped the melted hand grips off (a sticky, icky job!) and removed the distorted pedals.  Every bit of grease was hardened to resin, so I had to soak, clean, and re-grease the bottom bracket, both wheel hubs, and the headset.  None of the cups showed wear, and I reused all the ball bearings.  I replaced the rear derailleur, grip shifters, hand grips, and chain; replaced a couple cables; put on new tubes, tires and brake pads; and tuned everything up. Oh, I also added new Globe round rubber pedals, because I thought they looked interesting and because they snag on things a lot less than the old square platforms.

    This amounts to a frame-up rebuild.   It was the most money and most work I’ve put into a rescue bike.  Still,  the outcome was an unusual bike that’s fun to use and ride.

    The frame had a sticker showing the manufacturer as Montague, which was easy to research.  Around 1988, the Montague Corporation, of Cambridge, Mass., began producing full-sized folding bicycles with 26” or 700 mm wheels. In the early1990s, Montague began working with the automobile industry,designing bicycle models for various companies including BMW, General Motors, Mitsubishi Motors, Subaru, Toyota, Honda and Peugeot. In 1996, Montague folding bikes gained international attention when the Montague BMW folder was chosen as the first ever official Olympic mountain bike for the Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta. “Two thousand of these bikes (painted red, white, and blue) were featured in the Games’ closing ceremonies. Olympic athletes and staff rode in formation on Montague bikes to make the image of the Olympic rings,” reports the Montague web site.

    My Montague would have come in the trunk of a new BMW, and is similar to the 1996 Olympic version.  Montague staff identified this individual bike as being “from 1994 to 1995″

    Now I have a neat folding bike that I can stow in the RV or even the back of my wife’s tiny Chev Aveo.

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